jellyfishandpug

Easter greetings at St. Bishoy

  • Egyptian guy: Happy Easter!
  • Me: Happy Easter!
  • Egyptian guy: Christos Anesti!
  • Me: Alithos Anesti! Pekhristos Aftonf!
  • Egyptian guy: What?
  • Me: Y'know..."Christos Anesti" in Coptic...? Like father taught us all last Easter?
  • Egyptian guy: 'Tottus'? Is that English? What are you talking about?
  • Me: How Fr. Marcus taught us how to say it in Coptic last Easter...
  • Egyptian guy: I don't know what you mean. "Christos Anesti" is how we say it in Coptic...
  • Me: *cries silent bitter tears for the world*
  • Older Egyptian lady, talking to me but gesturing towards the guy: You know, sometimes we just say things the way we grew up saying them, but we don't know...
  • +++
  • Dn. John: Happy Easter!
  • Me: Happy Easter!
  • Dn. John: Christos Anesti!
  • Me: Alithos Anesti! And, um...Pekhristos aftonf...?
  • Dn. John: KHEN OUMETHMI AFTONF!!
  • Me: Oh, thank goodness....I thought nobody remembered!
  • Dn. John: Yeah...nobody uses the Coptic...I guess it's easier to say it in Greek.
  • My brain: "Easier to say"? All of you speak ARABIC without a second thought!
lebnaniye
lebnaniye:


erikkwakkel:
Sharing a binding
This is a clever book from the 18th century, printed in Oxford in 1756. It presents both the Old and New Testament, although the books are not bound together the regular way, behind one another. Instead, the binder opted to place them next to each other. This very rare binding technique is part of a family that includes the dos-à-dos (or “back to back”) binding, which I blogged about before (here). Having the two testaments bound this way allowed the reader to consult passages from both books at the same time. Indeed, the empty pages in the front and back are filled with notes, including in Greek and Hebrew. It appears this clever binding had a reader to match.
Pic: Manchester, Chetham’s Library (source).

So. cool.

lebnaniye:

erikkwakkel:

Sharing a binding

This is a clever book from the 18th century, printed in Oxford in 1756. It presents both the Old and New Testament, although the books are not bound together the regular way, behind one another. Instead, the binder opted to place them next to each other. This very rare binding technique is part of a family that includes the dos-à-dos (or “back to back”) binding, which I blogged about before (here). Having the two testaments bound this way allowed the reader to consult passages from both books at the same time. Indeed, the empty pages in the front and back are filled with notes, including in Greek and Hebrew. It appears this clever binding had a reader to match.

Pic: Manchester, Chetham’s Library (source).

So. cool.

un-moment-de-silence
edmundofthewest:

I love how the Triduum brings people together, kinda like Christmas. We gathered before to anticipate the Nativity of Our Lord, and this night we gathered to keep watch and pray, in anticipation of His passion and death, and ultimately His Ressurection. Such intimacy, such peace. And yet, how would we know satisfaction without having first known hunger? Who could hate Lent, having shared among others in His suffering? I’m right here with you as we enter deeper into Mystery.

edmundofthewest:

I love how the Triduum brings people together, kinda like Christmas. We gathered before to anticipate the Nativity of Our Lord, and this night we gathered to keep watch and pray, in anticipation of His passion and death, and ultimately His Ressurection. Such intimacy, such peace. And yet, how would we know satisfaction without having first known hunger? Who could hate Lent, having shared among others in His suffering? I’m right here with you as we enter deeper into Mystery.